week twenty

What’s your contribution?

Years ago, I heard this question on a short film. I hate that I can’t remember where exactly, but it was asked in the context of basically, what are you doing for someone besides yourself? Take your job, for instance; many of us wouldn’t go to work if we weren’t getting paid, right? Think beyond the paycheck. What does management say about you? Your coworkers? If you have regular clients, why do they keep returning?

I recently posed a similar question (thanks again for your feedback!), but I want to dig a little deeper. I know there are some people who have yet to figure out their purpose(s). I am all for redefining and revising; having a sole purpose your entire life is not always reality.

I think that if you’re a great conversationalist, that is your purpose. If your laughter is infectious or you’re quick-witted, part of your purpose is to spread joy. If you’re dependable, your purpose is in putting others at ease because they know you’ll be there in a time of need.

Your purpose doesn’t have to be shiny and conspicuous.

Many purposes are not going to make headlines or become household names. Oprah has not done anything extraordinary if you really break it down; she was merely given the opportunity to connect with people (live her purpose) on a world stage. What matters is you glorifying your purpose. Maybe you’re the Oprah in your friends circle. What naturally gives you a sense of connectivity and responsibility? What acts come easily and bring you joy? What are you good at that you’ve been suppressing?

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12 thoughts on “week twenty

      1. Yes. The squeaky wheel gets the grease. I have advocated for my brother Stephen who has Autism for many years. If you have a developmental disabled family member you must take the lead with agencies, politicians and community leaders. I also try to help any disabled People in my neighborhood.

        We must take responsibility for our community. I’m constantly calling 311 NYC special phone number for nonemergency services. Brooklyn has a big rat problem caused by trash and garbage. I get the control number from 311 then I call my Council representative and he gets in touch with Sanitation and the department of health.

        As an employee of the Brooklyn Public Library I promote the High School Equivalency Diploma formerly known as the GED program. Plus I advocate for Veterans being that I am a Veteran.

        Many Veterans need help. Especially Vietnam Veterans. They’re in their 70s. I am 60. As I explained to our Congressman Hakeem Jeffries that our age group is running out of time. We must have special programs and services before we leave this earth. The Library has case management services and I’m the Liaison for Veterans.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. All great things that make an impact! Imagine if we all id a little…
          And I’m in agreement with what you’ve said; my dad is a Vietnam vet and it seems like they’re being forgotten before they’re gone.

          Liked by 1 person

  1. Connecting with strangers comes easily for me. So I decided to get my masters in Clinical Mental Health Counseling but I put off going for 3 years to pursue something that paid more. In the end, I went with my passion!

    Liked by 1 person

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